Tag Archives: scar

A Scar, A History

It is better to be defeated standing for a high principle than to run by committing subterfuge. – Grover Cleveland

You may be thinking about my previous post about my marathon wristband.

Do you think a scar is a bad thing?

Nothing is good nor bad. Unless you give a meaning to it.

A scar can be a constant reminder. A painful reminder. A reminder on the struggle, the pain, and the recovery.

A scar isn’t necessarily bad.

What is a future without a past? What are we humans if we forget on our history?

We should always look forward, to anticipate what bright future that we will enjoy. While we should constantly look back, to appreciate the struggle we once have.

We should forgive, but never to forget.

The wristband. It tells the story of  the efforts that I didn’t put in. The preparation that I was lacking in. The determination that was failing.

We should forgive, but never to forget.

 

As with everything, we see things through our lens, our understanding, our beliefs.

Do you view the scar as it is? Or do you view the scar as something that you can improve on – for you, for your loved ones, for the society?

Let’s make an informed choice and decide to make the world a better place. And it all starts with you  – We should forgive, but never to forget.

 

Meng

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Standard Chartered Wristband

If you fall behind, run faster. Never give up, never surrender and rise up against the odds. – Jesse Jackson

There’s one thing that I still kept from last year’s Standard Chartered Marathon. Besides the running tee and the finisher tee. And the finisher medal.

7:30:54. It was engraved on my yellow wristband.

 

I wear it daily. That small, yellow wristband.

On my left hand.

A reminder of the timing I took to complete my full marathon.

It wasn’t my personal best (my best timing was slightly over 7 hours).

It wasn’t my goal for the run (my goal was 6 hours).

It wasn’t something that I am proud of. It was a reminder.

Just like a scar. It was a reminder.

A reminder of I should have done better preparation – to practise more.

A reminder of I could have run faster. And not to walk more.

A reminder of I should push one more step forward. And not to hide under the tree.

A reminder of I should focus my energy on running. And not complaining of the weather.

A reminder of I didn’t give my all to it. I didn’t push harder.

My friends keep telling me, “You’ve done well. You’ve completed the race. That’s what matters.”

Yes, they are right. I would agree with them. Agree with them, if only.

If only I knew I had given my very best.

Did you carry with you an artifact of the past?

A reminder of what you could have done well?

But remember, it is a reminder of the past so that you know that you could have done better in the future.

And not a tool to torment your soul in the future.

Accept it and embrace it. And move on.

Let go and move on.  Be empowered to create a brighter tomorrow.

 

Meng